The chic victim role

The chic victim role

The responsibility / school error allows people to pass the responsibility for solving their problems on to others. The ability to blame others for responsibility gives people temporary exhilaration and the feeling of being morally right.
Unfortunately, a by-product of the internet and social media is that it is easier than ever to shift responsibility – even if it goes beyond the smallest rule – to another group or person. This game of guilt and shame has even become quite popular, in some “crowds” it even seems to be “cool”. This high-profile sharing of “injustices” attracts far more attention and emotional outpouring on social media than other events. It rewards people who continually feel like victims with increasing awareness and sympathy.
The “victim role chic” is fashionable left and right today, with the rich as with the poor. It is probably the first time in human history that every single demographic group feels treated unfairly – all at the same time. And everyone is riding the high horse of moral indignation.
The more people see themselves as victims at the slightest violation, the more difficult it is to recognize the real victims. People get addicted to the feeling of being attacked or offended because it gives them a kick: being self-righteous and morally superior just feels good.
We should choose our battlefields carefully and at the same time try to put ourselves a little bit into our so-called enemy. We should be skeptical of news and media with a healthy dose of skepticism, and not be too black and white about those who disagree. We should support values ​​such as honesty or transparency and treat values ​​such as “being right”, “feeling good” or “revenge” with a healthy degree of mistrust. The “democratic” values ​​are more difficult to maintain in the chatter of the networked world, but we should acknowledge our responsibility and promote it despite everything …

All the best
Martina